Sandwiches & Burgers

Open-Faced Cheesesteak Sandwiches on Portobello “Buns”

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You’ve read the latest news about meat and eggs, I’m sure.  If you’re wondering if you should give up meat and eggs, well, my answer is no. I’m one dietitian who is certainly not going to give up meat and eggs just because of one study.  Not to say that I don’t think the study is important to consider.  I mean, eat less, sure, but give up?  No way!  Instead, I’m going to continue doing what I’ve been doing; 1) telling people not to take unnecessary supplements, such as lecithin, which, while we know has some positive effects on our health, isn’t typically necessary to take as a dietary supplement, 2) telling people not to follow a diet such as Adkins, because it’s absurdly high in eggs and beef, and low in fruits and vegetables, and most importantly 3) consuming eggs and meat in moderation, which to me means 1-2 times a week (and small portions each time).  Nick and I typically eat beef once every other week, and eggs once a week, maybe twice (and I typically just eat the whites.  Keep in mind it’s the yolks that have the choline and cholesterol).  And you know what?  That’s what we’re going to continue to do.That being said, please enjoy today’s recipe, which provides you with a very reasonable and non-Western-Diet-Like portion of red meat (ie: not 10 ounce, but 4.  Perfect) as well as an abundance of fresh vegetables.

Open Faced Cheesesteak Sandwiches

Ingredients

  • 8 portobello mushrooms, stemmed**
  • 1/2 tsp. plus 1/8 tsp. salt, divided
  • 1 tsp. fresh ground pepper
  • 1 Tbsp. sesame oil
  • 1 red bell pepper, seeded and sliced
  • 1 green bell pepper, seeded and slices
  • 1 small yellow onion, sliced**
  • 1 lb. boneless top sirloin steak, 1.5 to 2 inches thick, trimmed
  • 1 tsp. unsalted garlic and herb seasoning **
  • Olive oil cooking spray
  • 2 ounces reduced fat Swiss or cheddar cheese

Directions

  1.  Position oven rack to 6 to 8 inches from heat and preheat broiler to high.  Line a large rimmed baking sheet with foil.  Arrange portobellos on foil upside down and sprinkle with 1/4 tsp. salt and 1/4 tsp. black pepper.  Broil for 7-10 minutes, turning halfway, until tender when pierced with a form.  Transfer to a paper towel and drain any liquid released.  Line sheet with a new pieces of foil and preheat oven to 450 degrees.
  2.  Meanwhile, in a large ovenproof skillet on medium-high, heat oil.  Add bell peppers, onion, 1/8 tsp. salt and 1/4 tsp. black pepper.  Cook for about 12 minutes, stirring occasionally, until browned and tender.  Transfer to a medium bowl.
  3.  Pat steak dry and rub garlic seasoning, remaining 1/4th tsp. salt and remaining 1/2 tsp. black pepper all over steak.  Mist same ovenproof skillet with cooking spray and heat on medium-high.  Add steak and sear until browned, 30 seconds to 1 minute each, using tongs to hold steak in position if necessary. Transfer to oven and roast, 5 to 8 minutes for rare to medium-rare or 7 to 10 minutes for medium.  Transfer to a cutting board and rest for 5 minutes.  Switch oven back to broiler setting on high.
  4.  Arrange portobello upside down on prepared baking sheet.  Thinly slice steak against the grain and divide evenly among portobellos.  Top evenly with pepper-onion mixture and a piece of cheese.  Broil just until cheese is melted, about 1 minute.

** NOTE:  If you are following a low FODMAPs diet keep in mind mushrooms contain polyols.  I was able to handle one portobello cap, but you may be more sensitive.  Also, omit the garlic and herb seasoning, as garlic contains oligosaccharides (the “O” in FODMAPs).  I made these without the seasoning and they were still delicious with simply the salt and pepper.  Lastly, omit the onions, as they contains FODMAPs too.   Use extra peppers if you want!

Source: CalorieCount.com
Estimated Nutrition Facts for 2 open-faced sandwiches (1-serving)

Nutrition Highlights:  Good source of fiber and calcium, excellent source of protein, vitamins A and C, and iron.

So, this is how I respond to the latest news about red meat.  Basically, it’s a reasonable portion (~3-4 ounces), topped with and surrounded by lots of vegetables (and a beer….yeah, one drink a day for women is good for their hearts, come on now!).
Is it strange that I actually prefer vegetables as my “grain”?  I mean, offer me portobellos for a bun and I’ll say “heck yeah!”, offer me spaghetti squash for noodles and I’ll dive right in.  It’s two great things in one (great flavor and nutrition) so it’s a double win.

Will you be changing your intake of meat and/or eggs since the release of the latest research?  I’d love to hear your thoughts.  And meanwhile, have a great Tuesday.  I’m off to teach a group of preschoolers about how to create a healthy plate.  Then tonight I’ll teach my last diabetes class of the season (so sad, I’ve been really enjoying this class).

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