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Health & Food

The Dr. Oz Effect

I don’t often watch the Dr. Oz show, but every day I find out exactly what his topics were on his show that morning, even without checking the website or looking at the TV Guide. No, I’m not psychic or telepathic or anything, but instead, I find out this information based on the random supplement requests (and sometimes food requests) we get from customers. Sometimes I wonder why he doesn’t call himself “Dr. Supplements”.

Check out his website and tell me what you think. BUT WAIT! STOP! Before you click the link….

Source: istock photo

Grab a stress ball, because you’re going to need it!

Source: istock photo

After all, this website is really just one giant fad diet in disguise. Not to say that his information is inaccurate. In fact, the first couple times I watched his show several years ago I really enjoyed it. But as his show has evolved it’s turned into a giant mess in my opinion. His show and his website are filled with about a thousand different options for how to “lose weight” and “be healthier” and you have to decide which one you want to choose…or heck, do them all! (hence the reason for the stress ball, for someone like me who just thinks this is information overload!).

Like I said at the beginning of this post, literally every day I have two or three (if not more) customers come into the store asking for a product that Dr. Oz is promoting. I call it “Dr. Oz’s product of the day”. Very rarely is is food based.

Have you heard of any of the following?

  • Keto-7
  • Raspberry ketones
  • Satiereal Saffron supplements
  • Artichoke heart root
  • Coconut palm sugar

And did you know they are miracle cures for weight loss, lethargy, decreasing blood sugar, and so much more?! Note: I’m joking.
I could easily turn this post into a complete Dr. Oz bash post, but I won’t. After all, I respect him in many ways. I think he’s a brilliant man, I just don’t think he understands the impact he has on American’s, and how much of what he says and/or puts on his website is making people think that weight loss and health is as simple as taking A, B, and C.
Another issue is how much of what he says is misconstrued. Dr. Oz can make one statement on his show and it can get manipulated in so many ways. I had a women once tell me she was drinking 100% grapefruit juice because Dr. Oz said it would speed up metabolism and help her burn anything “bad” that she ate. Yikes. Sounds like adding insult to injury in my opinion.
And for others (like me), it’s making health and wellness more complicated, because much of what he talks about on his show are products that I’ve never heard of and that simply can’t be found in normal stores. In Dr. Oz’s world, as it seems, the perfect cocktail of health is not found in food, but in supplements. So….. what should we eat?!Dear Dr. Oz,

Why not focus more on whole foods, exercise, and good nutrition?

And why not be honest with your audience and let them know that losing weight is difficult, and maintaining that weight loss is even MORE difficult. Be there to support them and lift them up, give them motivation, and assure them that while it is difficult, it’s doable, as long as you do it right by taking your time and making the appropriate lifestyle changes. Dr. Oz, you have the entire nation listening to you, TAKE ADVANTAGE! You’re teaching people that weight loss (or beautiful skin, or wound healing, or getting a six-pack) is as simple as taking a pill, and you may not realize you are doing this, but I hear it every day.

Sincerely,

Gina Casagrande (a frustrated dietitian)

QUESTION: What are your thought son Dr. Oz? It’s ok if you love him and love his show, I like him too, I just wish he would change his platform a bit (ok, a lot!) Do you have any suggestions for Dr. Supplements….I mean Dr. Oz?

One last thing for the day. Thank you for all of your wonderful comments on my last post. I received the following question from a reader;

I’ve struggled with anorexia for 11 years. I’m curious, when you say you have to “watch what you eat” in order to not gain, is it different than watching what you eat to lose (follow the ED)?

Here is my answer:

Yes, it is much, much different. Actually, when I had an eating disorder I was more obsessed with not gaining, rather than necessarily losing. When I lost weight I considered it a bonus, but I was more obsessed with controlling my weight and keeping it at 90 pounds (or around there). Now I feel much more comfortable in my own skin, and if I gain a pound or two I do not have the same reaction as I did back in those days. Now I have a more realistic and healthy attitude and reaction towards any shifts in weight, and I don’t let a number ruin my entire day, as I did in the past. Thanks for your question, and I promise you will get to this point at one time too!

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